Stebeli patarei ehitusest

Patarei ehitus oli tohutu kallis.

Selleks eraldati 20 miljonit rubla. Rajatise laed olid kaetud 3.5 meetrise betoonikihiga, mida valati ühe joonega: Komandopunkti neli ööd ja päeva, kummagi torni valamiseks kulus kokku kümme päeva. Patarei ehituseks toodi Moskvast kaks hiigelkraanat DEMAG. Betoonivaluks vajalikke lõhutud kive osteti kohalikelt elanikelt ja nende eest maksti tsaari kuldrubladega, sest vene raha ei tahtnud keegi saada.Patarei ehitus oli tohutu kallis. Selleks eraldati 20 miljonit rubla. Rajatise laed olid kaetud 3.5 meetrise betoonikihiga, mida valati ühe joonega: Komandopunkti neli ööd ja päeva, kummagi torni valamiseks kulus kokku kümme päeva. Patarei ehituseks toodi Moskvast kaks hiigelkraanat DEMAG. Betoonivaluks vajalikke lõhutud kive osteti kohalikelt elanikelt ja nende eest maksti tsaari kuldrubladega, sest vene raha ei tahtnud keegi saada.

Storyteller: Bruno Pao
Used sources and references:

"Sõrve sääre otsa lood" Koostaja Bruno Pao Kuressaare 2004

Related objects

The Coastal Battery No 315 command post (Stebel)

This battery command centre is situated in a now deserted part of the village of Sääre.

The coastal defence battery was named after its commander, Captain Aleksandr Stebel. Construction began in May 1940 and the battery was completed shortly before the outbreak of World War II. The battery deterred German marines in Lõu Bay and provided covering fire for the Red Army’s Lõpe-Kaimri defensive line. The artillery was destroyed during the Red Army retreat in October 1941, after which the lower levels of the barbettes were flooded. The complex comprised two artillery barbettes mounting two 180-mm guns, a command centre, a fire control tower in the shape of a windmill, a generator and a heating plant.

Unfortunately, these intriguingly engineered battery positions are situated on private property and are difficult to locate. As such, anyone interested will have to make do with viewing the command centre from the outside, as its lower level is submerged. The centre was drained in 2010, but had filled up with water again just a few months later.